We’re Offering Complimentary Support to Clients for COVID-19 Best Practices

It is not business as usual for our clients, and PerfectServe wants to help. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare organizations are working quickly to address potential capacity challenges, communication needs, patient education opportunities, clinician staffing shortfalls, and more. We have already supported many clients in their COVID-19 efforts, and we’ve assembled lists of best practices to share with the industry.

We have fielded and executed requests from healthcare organizations of all sizes, including Prisma Health and United Health Services. We’ve learned from these experiences and want to replicate the benefits for other clients at no charge.

Our Offer to Customers

To help during this difficult time, PerfectServe is extending the following to all of our customers:

  • Free software and services for Patient & Family Communication (automated patient outreach via text message) for COVID-19 purposes. Carrier message rates may apply.
  • Free services to implement best practices for COVID-19 purposes.

This offer applies regardless of the PerfectServe, Telmediq, or Lightning Bolt solution(s) you currently use—Clinical Communication & Collaboration, Nurse Mobility, Patient & Family Communication, Answering Service, Contact Center, or Provider Scheduling. If you’re interested in learning more, please call 866.844.5484, email connect@perfectserve.net, or enter your contact information in the form to the left.

How can this offer help?

Because time is of the essence, we focused the offer on impactful software and services that can be implemented quickly.

With PerfectServe’s Patient & Family Communication (PFC) solution, your health system can engage patients with relevant COVID-19 updates and instructions via text message. Sample PFC use cases that have been implemented recently include:

  • Announcing curbside test access to patients. An on-demand message is initiated by nurses in a call center, which points the patient to a specific clinic site. The message instructs the patient to park, call a designated phone number, and wait for a test to be administered at their vehicle.
  • Two-way secure messaging with patients. A secure, encrypted messaging interface enables two-way communication with patients. This gives providers the ability to conduct risk or screening assessments to ask about symptoms and monitor responses.
  • Informing patients how, when, and where to access care. This includes both physical care access and hyperlinks to existing virtual clinic or telehealth platforms.
  • Providing patient education on best practices for disease avoidance and management. This can be as simple as pointing patients to the CDC website.
  • Trying to catch potential cases before they walk in the door. Directly after a reminder for an existing appointment is delivered, another message follows that asks the patient to call a telephone number to initiate a phone screening with a clinician if they have flu-like symptoms.

To implement PerfectServe’s PFC platform, customers supply formatted patient lists and data, including patient telephone numbers.

Beyond PFC, we’d also like to facilitate new critical communications to your care teams with free services to implement best practices. Every facility is unique, and we’re extending no-cost assistance to help you implement new workflows, make adjustments to current settings, or otherwise optimize your PerfectServe solution in a way that best supports your organization’s COVID-19 response efforts.

The following have been some of the most common best practices requests:

  • Setup or Modification of Team Alerts/Broadcast Groups/Distribution Lists: Multidisciplinary teams for incident response, infection management, and patient tracking have been key to COVID-19 response efforts. PerfectServe has worked with a number of customers to implement new team alerts (also called broadcast groups or distribution lists) or modify existing team alerts by adding members.
  • In most hospital settings, the process for communicating specific incident or patient details to a larger care team is manually intensive. These workflows typically have many steps, numerous decision points, and multiple handoffs, creating potential for communication breakdowns and delays in time-sensitive situations.
  • Team alerts automate many of the steps in the rapid response process, such as sending notifications to all team members—including team leadership—at the same time. With a single communication, all appropriate care team members are identified and contacted simultaneously, which speeds time to treatment and improves patient outcomes.
  • Schedule and Assignment Changes: During a virus outbreak, healthcare organizations may experience unusual fluctuations in patient load, and their own providers are also at increased risk of falling ill or experiencing burnout. Several Physician Scheduling customers have reached out for assistance implementing new assignments and schedules to ensure their facilities are optimally staffed amidst changing conditions.

The above use cases are far from an exhaustive list. Heightened communication is more important than ever in times of crisis, and clinical communication and collaboration solutions make it possible to connect with the right person at the right time to respond more effectively to an emergent situation. Additionally, customers with secure messaging have immediate access to hundreds of thousands of clinicians across the country who also use PerfectServe, providing a network effect that allows communication to transcend the boundaries of your facility.

Bottom line?

We are always grateful for the care that doctors, nurses, and healthcare professionals provide for patients and families, but perhaps never more than now. We are keen to provide assistance to our customers, many of whom are on the front lines of this unpredictable public health crisis.

The PerfectServe team is ready to support your COVID-19 efforts. Please contact us today to get the conversation started.

Managing the surprisingly troublesome impact of real-time healthcare on clinical decision-making

We live in an age of instant gratification. From the texts we send friends and family to the orders we place on Amazon.com, we’ve come to expect immediate results: instant responses, next-day shipping, etc.

The idea of immediacy in healthcare communications is not new. In fact, in 2015, healthcare analyst Gartner outlined a vision for what it dubbed the “real-time health system”—a landscape where healthcare professionals will be constantly aware of what’s happening within their systems and with their patients.

As a person living in the digital age, you’ve probably experienced real-time awareness in other parts of your life: the repetitive dings of received text messages, the intermittent beeps of calendar alerts, the near-constant hum as your smartphone vibrates over and over to let you know your mother, children and cousins have uploaded photos to Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. In fact, as I’m typing this piece, I’ve heard alerts for two personal text messages that I’ve yet to look at (the temptation is maddening), four work-related emails (that I did have to stop and look at), a notification that someone commented on a thread I replied to on Facebook and more.

While there’s definitely a benefit to each of us knowing what’s happening in our expanded universe in real time—and we can easily draw a direct line to the benefits that doctors, nurses and patients would experience if they could communicate instantaneously while coordinating care—the influx of information is simply overwhelming.

And when alarm fatigue sets in, important messages get missed, the communication cycle breaks down and what was once a valuable resource becomes a liability. Overwhelmed and inundated clinicians cannot optimally use their invaluable expertise to make effective clinical decisions that deliver great health outcomes.

Aggregating, analyzing and managing the distribution of clinical information

Managing the flow of data and alert fatigue is a real challenge that clinicians and the IT teams that support them need to understand. Clinicians need “just the facts, ma’am,” so to speak, and they need to know which set of facts pertain directly to them and the patients for whom they are caring. Receiving more than enough information is not always a good thing, especially when the situation calls for fast thinking and quick decisions.

Investments made in technologies implemented over the past several years have enabled healthcare as an industry to generate very large amounts of digitized clinical information. The challenge is to aggregate this patient data in real time to generate new knowledge about a patient and distribute it in a way that does not inundate the clinician recipients with unnecessary information. Physicians and nurses should receive information they need in order to act in that moment. Everything else is noise.


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Implementing communication-driven workflows

Once new knowledge is made available and deemed relevant to a given clinical situation, it’s important to enable workflows that drive this information to the right care team members, who can take action in that moment. Hospital-based communication workflows must encompass all modalities, adhere to strict security mandates and facilitate reliable exchanges among clinicians across boundaries (e.g., acute, pre-acute and post-acute care settings). This kind of clinical integration is the future of healthcare communications.

If clinicians are inundated with unnecessary information, messages and alerts, combined with a communication workflow that creates barriers to a) finding the right care team member to contact, b) finding the contact method that the clinician prefers and c) knowing whether the intended recipient received the message, the workflow is flawed and is inhibiting the decision-making that leads to higher standards of patient care.

Leveraging clinical expertise

The personal judgment of experienced healthcare professionals is irreplaceable in effective, real-time decision-making. Technological advances are no doubt improving healthcare, but human intuition can never be replaced by a new device or software. However, that intuition can be inhibited by technologies if they are not strategically implemented and managed. In this sense, real-time healthcare could, ironically, be eroding quality.

To truly leverage the hundreds of collective years of clinical expertise housed in the minds of your hospital’s medical staff—the expertise that yields great outcomes—you must remove the barriers to effective communication. Collecting patient data in real time is an important part of that. But analyzing and aggregating that data into digestible, valuable pieces of information that can be easily shared and collaborated on is the follow-through that is often overlooked.

The gravitation toward instant gratification isn’t going away. And it’s important to understand that the concept doesn’t apply simply to generating patient data as healthcare events are occurring, but also to the ability to extract the significant portions and begin collaborating with the broader care team to interpret the data and derive a plan to deliver high-value care.

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